Articles in Category: Training and Performance

Red Flags

Written by Don Williams BSc, MChiro, ICSSD. on Wednesday, 23 September 2015. Posted in Massage, General Health, Acupuncture, Training and Performance, Chiropractic

Red Flags

Red Flags

By Don Williams

B.Sc., M.Chiro., ICSSD., PG Dip. NMS Rehabilitation Cert DNS. Memb: FICS, CEA

 

Health care practice is an interesting and ever changing profession. One of the challenges that keep us on our toes is the assessment and management of different injuries and ailments.

 

The first goal in assessment is (or certainly should be) to identify what the complaint is, whether it is a serious or potentially serious condition that requires urgent intervention.

 

Recently, we have had a number of quite serious cases which have left us a little baffled as to the management they had unfortunately NOT received.

 

So this month I thought I would write an article on important symptoms to watch out for so you are not feeling sore and sorry.

 

Red Flags; this is believe it or not, a technical term for signs and symptoms which may indicate serious underlying pathology. These flags are many and varied and their presence is merely a potential indicator of pathology. This means that just because you have a “Red Flag” doesn’t mean you have a problem.

 

In compiling this list, it is by no means exhaustive and is a reflection of some of the things that we see showing up in our clinic.

 

So regionally, what are the things you should watch out for and what can they mean?

 

Back Pain

If you have back pain with referral down the leg, total numbness or loss of muscle strength it may be important. Loss of bowel and bladder control is certainly something we would want to know about.

 

Chest Pain

Most people know that chest pain can be an indicator of a heart attack. Most people realise that this is more commonly on the left side, however, pain in the lower front of the neck, the left arm, the left upper back and the right side of the chest can also be indicators. This would be reinforced by an increase in pain with exercise and or shortness of breath.

 

Night pain

Pain that wakes you from sleep is a concern, additionally; if this pain is accompanied by night sweats we would be a little more concerned. Sudden loss or gain in weight for no apparent reason is also a concern.

 

Headaches

“The worst headache I have ever had” is not a great thing to hear. If this is in conjunction with vomiting and dizziness it is more of a concern. The feeling that the head is going to explode is more of a concern. Disturbances in any of your higher senses (vision, taste, hearing or smell) can also be a concern

 

Pain

Unremitting pain of 6 months or more of duration may be serious. If this is high intensity pain, then it is more of a concern. If the problem is not responding to conservative treatment then it is more concerning again.

 

If you have had a problem which won’t go away or you have some interesting symptoms that you are just not sure about, then get them checked out. Sometimes they may mean nothing, sometimes they may be important. My thought, always, if in doubt check it out.

Shockwave Therapy

on Tuesday, 05 March 2019. Posted in Massage, Newsletters, General Health, Sporting Injuries, Training and Performance

Shockwave Therapy

Shockwave Therapy

Shock wave therapy is a low frequency shock wave focused treatment that targets a specific acute or chronic condition. It is classified as a non-invasive treatment that generates acoustic shock waves, via a hand held device. Shock wave is a multidisciplinary device that can be utilised by chiropractors, physiotherapists, remedial massage therapists, sports medicine, urology and veterinary medicine. This hand held device helps kick start the body’s natural healing ability within the tissue, this is done by stimulating the metabolism, and increasing blood circulation. Its main assets are fast pain relief and mobility restoration.

Some of the conditions that can be treated from shock wave therapy are:

-          Plantar fasciitis

-          Heel Spurs

-          Tennis elbow/Golfer’s elbow

-          Chronic Tendinopathy

-          Shin Splints

-          Calcifications

-          Hip pain

-          Hamstring injuries

-          Shoulder pain

-          Muscle, Myofascia & Trigger Points

Shock wave therapy has been said to be an ideal therapy for injuries/conditions that have been unresolved by medications, rest and other therapies, but with the combination of shock wave and other therapies it can be utilised to help speed up injury recovery times. The treatment of shock wave can be a little painful, but depending on the patient and the type of condition being treated the intensity can be changed throughout the session.

Written By Luke Attkins

Dip Remedial Massage, Certificate IV of Massage Therapy

Spot Reduction

on Friday, 18 January 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Training and Performance

How Many Sit Ups Do I Need to Do to Get a 6 Pack?

This is a very common question we get asked here at Institute of Sports and Spines. The truth is that there isn’t a specific number of sit ups that would give any of us a six pack. Seeing results isn’t that simple.

There are claims that performing certain exercises targeting specific areas of the body can reduce the amount of subcutaneous fat in that area. This is known as spot reduction and has been disproved by a significant amount of scientific research.

Focusing all of your attention on a ‘problem area’ of your body will not result in fat reduction. You can definitely see improvement in muscular strength and even size when working on specific areas of the body but the amount of fat under the skin would have minimal change.

So how can I get rid of my belly bulge/thunder thighs/tuck shop lady arms?

It has been found that performing a combination of cardiorespiratory and resistance training is the most efficient way to reduce subcutaneous fat. When performing cardiorespiratory exercise we expend large amounts of energy (dependent on type of exercise). With regular resistance training (weight lifting) our muscles get more efficient and even at rest will be taking in energy (burning more energy).

It is also very important to be mindful of what you are eating and drinking - eating more foods from the 5 food groups, eating wholegrains, eating less highly refined carbohydrates, and drinking less alcohol and soft drinks.

Seeing results takes time and hard work, not 1346 sit ups. Consistency is key in achieving your goals and keeping your motivation on track is essential. Rather than focusing on a specific part of your body or a specific exercise, focus on making healthy lifestyle changes and you will get closer to improving that ‘problem area’.

 

Written by Emily Holzberger

Qualifications: B. ExSS Majoring in Clinical ExPhys.