Articles in Category: Training and Performance

Exercise Myth Busters: I don't need to lose weight so I don't need to exercise!

on Wednesday, 06 March 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Nutrition and Recipes, Training and Performance

Fitness vs Fatness

Exercise Myth Busters: I don't need to lose weight so I don't need to exercise!

I’m sure everyone has got that one friend or family member who doesn’t feel they have to exercise because they are ‘slim’ or ‘don’t have to lose weight’.

A meta-analysis completed in 2014 called ‘Fitness and Fatness’ investigated the impact of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and weight on all-cause mortality (risk of death). It was determined that fit individuals at any weight had a significantly lower risk of mortality (death) regardless of their body mass index (BMI). This means that a person who is considered obese but has good CRF has a lower risk of dying than a person who is considered a normal weight but has poor CRF (see graph).

This study changed the way health professionals approached exercise interventions; the focus shifted from weight loss to CRF.

So when you hear someone say ‘I don’t need to lose weight so I don’t need to exercise’ you can tell them that regardless of their weight they should be aiming for high levels of fitness to live a long, healthy life.

There are also so many benefits to performing exercise, just to name a few:

- Significantly reduces disease risk: cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, dementia, osteoporosis, the list goes on.

- Improved quality of life

- Improved mental health and self-esteem

 

 

Written by Emily Holzberger

Qualifications: B. ExSS Majoring in Clinical ExPhys.   

Shockwave Therapy

on Tuesday, 05 March 2019. Posted in Massage, Newsletters, General Health, Sporting Injuries, Training and Performance

Shockwave Therapy

Shockwave Therapy

Shock wave therapy is a low frequency shock wave focused treatment that targets a specific acute or chronic condition. It is classified as a non-invasive treatment that generates acoustic shock waves, via a hand held device. Shock wave is a multidisciplinary device that can be utilised by chiropractors, physiotherapists, remedial massage therapists, sports medicine, urology and veterinary medicine. This hand held device helps kick start the body’s natural healing ability within the tissue, this is done by stimulating the metabolism, and increasing blood circulation. Its main assets are fast pain relief and mobility restoration.

Some of the conditions that can be treated from shock wave therapy are:

-          Plantar fasciitis

-          Heel Spurs

-          Tennis elbow/Golfer’s elbow

-          Chronic Tendinopathy

-          Shin Splints

-          Calcifications

-          Hip pain

-          Hamstring injuries

-          Shoulder pain

-          Muscle, Myofascia & Trigger Points

Shock wave therapy has been said to be an ideal therapy for injuries/conditions that have been unresolved by medications, rest and other therapies, but with the combination of shock wave and other therapies it can be utilised to help speed up injury recovery times. The treatment of shock wave can be a little painful, but depending on the patient and the type of condition being treated the intensity can be changed throughout the session.

Written By Luke Attkins

Dip Remedial Massage, Certificate IV of Massage Therapy

Myth Busters: It's Important to Stretch before Exercise

on Thursday, 14 February 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Sporting Injuries, Ergonomics, Training and Performance

Myth Busters: It's Important to Stretch before Exercise

For many years it was believed that performing static stretches before exercising reduced your risk of injury. However research has shown that this is not the case.

 

Static stretching is a method of stretching where you gradually lengthen your muscles and tendons by holding your body in a certain position for approximately 30 seconds. An example of this might be a hamstring stretch (see below). This type of stretching is useful in improving flexibility and muscle function.

 

Stretch 1 

A study completed in Norway that had over 1000 participants found that there was little to no reduction in injury risk when stretching was performed before exercise. Research has shown that performing a warm up made up of dynamic stretches can increase body awareness, strength and neuromuscular control which reduces the risk of injury.

Stretch 2  Stretch 3

Dynamic stretching is a type of stretching where you gradually lengthen muscles and tendons and also warm them up by moving your joint through a range of motion similar to the activity you are about to perform. For example if you are about to go for a walk/run/cycle performing leg swings can be beneficial (see below).

 

Static stretching is still important to perform after you exercise. This can help in easing muscle soreness caused by Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness (DOMS) which can occur 24-48 hours after an exercise session. It is a good idea to perform these stretches in your cool down, focusing on the areas of your body that you worked most.

 

So if you’ve been doing static stretches as part of your warm up at the gym or on the field maybe swap it for some dynamic stretches and save the static stretches for your cool down.

 

If you would like to learn or know more about what stretches are most beneficial for you as an individual get in contact with Emily our Exercise Physiologist here at Institute of Sports and Spines!

 

 

Written by Emily Holzberger

Qualifications: B. ExSS Majoring in Clinical ExPhys.   

 

Resource: ABC Health and Wellbeing, 2014