Articles in Category: Sporting Injuries

Shin Splints

on Thursday, 02 May 2013. Posted in Sporting Injuries, Acupuncture

Shin Splints is the common term for anterior or medial
tibial stress syndrome. It is a common lower leg injury predominantly found in
those who participate in running sports.
The most common aggravating factors include an increase in training
volume, speed work or hill training or a change to a harder training surface.
In the non-running population walking on uneven ground for long periods or foot
control issues may be aggravating factors.[i]

 

 

Shockwave Therapy

on Tuesday, 05 March 2019. Posted in Massage, Newsletters, General Health, Sporting Injuries, Training and Performance

Shockwave Therapy

Shockwave Therapy

Shock wave therapy is a low frequency shock wave focused treatment that targets a specific acute or chronic condition. It is classified as a non-invasive treatment that generates acoustic shock waves, via a hand held device. Shock wave is a multidisciplinary device that can be utilised by chiropractors, physiotherapists, remedial massage therapists, sports medicine, urology and veterinary medicine. This hand held device helps kick start the body’s natural healing ability within the tissue, this is done by stimulating the metabolism, and increasing blood circulation. Its main assets are fast pain relief and mobility restoration.

Some of the conditions that can be treated from shock wave therapy are:

-          Plantar fasciitis

-          Heel Spurs

-          Tennis elbow/Golfer’s elbow

-          Chronic Tendinopathy

-          Shin Splints

-          Calcifications

-          Hip pain

-          Hamstring injuries

-          Shoulder pain

-          Muscle, Myofascia & Trigger Points

Shock wave therapy has been said to be an ideal therapy for injuries/conditions that have been unresolved by medications, rest and other therapies, but with the combination of shock wave and other therapies it can be utilised to help speed up injury recovery times. The treatment of shock wave can be a little painful, but depending on the patient and the type of condition being treated the intensity can be changed throughout the session.

Written By Luke Attkins

Dip Remedial Massage, Certificate IV of Massage Therapy

The Benefits of Stretching

on Wednesday, 06 March 2019. Posted in Massage, Newsletters, General Health, Sporting Injuries, Training and Performance

Stretching

There are many benefits to regular stretching, not only can stretching help increase your flexibility; it may also improve posture and body aches.

Increases Flexibility:

Regular stretching may help to increase your flexibility. Improved flexibility can help you perform daily activities with ease and may also help delay reduced mobility that can come with aging.

Increases Range of Motion:

The ability to move a joint through its full range of motion gives you more freedom of movement. Regular stretching may help increase your range of motion. A study found that both static and dynamic stretching are effective for increasing range of motion, although proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching may be more effective for immediate benefit.

Improves Performance in Physical Activities:

Dynamic stretching prior to physical activity has been shown to help your muscles prepare for the activity.

Increases Blood Flow to Muscles:

Regular stretching may improve your circulation which increases blood flow to your muscles. This may shorten your recovery time and reduce delayed onset muscle soreness.

The most common types of stretching are dynamic and static.

Dynamic Stretching:

Dynamic stretching involves the movement of joints through their full range of motion in a slow and controlled manner. They are often used as a warm-up prior to physical activity and there are no extended holds. Generally, the type of movement, or dynamic stretch used will be similar to the activity about to be performed. “High knees” or ‘butt kicks” are examples of dynamic stretching that may be performed before running.

Static Stretching:

Static stretching involves moving the body into a stretch and holding for an extended period of time. Timing of the extended stretch varies though they are commonly prescribed for 15-30 seconds at a time for 3-5 times. Static stretching can be performed actively by using your own muscles to hold the positions, or passively, using an external force such as a strap, a wall or another person. Bending down and touching your toes or letting the heels drop down off the edge of a step are examples of static stretching.

Dynamic and static stretching can be effective for increasing flexibility

Pre-activity dynamic stretching may improve performance

Post-activity static stretching may prevent delayed onset muscle soreness

Stretching is generally a safe activity that can be included as part of your daily activity

Written by Maharlia Kennedy

Dip. Remedial Massage