Articles in Category: Sporting Injuries

Myth Busters: It's Important to Stretch before Exercise

on Thursday, 14 February 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Sporting Injuries, Ergonomics, Training and Performance

Myth Busters: It's Important to Stretch before Exercise

For many years it was believed that performing static stretches before exercising reduced your risk of injury. However research has shown that this is not the case.

 

Static stretching is a method of stretching where you gradually lengthen your muscles and tendons by holding your body in a certain position for approximately 30 seconds. An example of this might be a hamstring stretch (see below). This type of stretching is useful in improving flexibility and muscle function.

 

Stretch 1 

A study completed in Norway that had over 1000 participants found that there was little to no reduction in injury risk when stretching was performed before exercise. Research has shown that performing a warm up made up of dynamic stretches can increase body awareness, strength and neuromuscular control which reduces the risk of injury.

Stretch 2  Stretch 3

Dynamic stretching is a type of stretching where you gradually lengthen muscles and tendons and also warm them up by moving your joint through a range of motion similar to the activity you are about to perform. For example if you are about to go for a walk/run/cycle performing leg swings can be beneficial (see below).

 

Static stretching is still important to perform after you exercise. This can help in easing muscle soreness caused by Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness (DOMS) which can occur 24-48 hours after an exercise session. It is a good idea to perform these stretches in your cool down, focusing on the areas of your body that you worked most.

 

So if you’ve been doing static stretches as part of your warm up at the gym or on the field maybe swap it for some dynamic stretches and save the static stretches for your cool down.

 

If you would like to learn or know more about what stretches are most beneficial for you as an individual get in contact with Emily our Exercise Physiologist here at Institute of Sports and Spines!

 

 

Written by Emily Holzberger

Qualifications: B. ExSS Majoring in Clinical ExPhys.   

 

Resource: ABC Health and Wellbeing, 2014

 

Popliteus Injury

on Wednesday, 05 September 2018. Posted in Massage, General Health, Sporting Injuries, Chiropractic

Popliteus Injury

By Luke Attkins

Diploma of Remedial Massage, Certificate IV of Massage Therapy

Member: AAMT, SCA, CAA, CA.

 

Have you ever tried to go for a run or walk and had the feeling that your knee was going to ‘lock up’ or ‘give out’ on you? This is a common cause of popliteus muscle injuries. The popliteus muscles is a small but strong muscle, that’s main action is to internally rotate the tibia (shin bone). Another action this muscle is involved with is the unlocking of the knee joint whilst bending the leg from a fully straightened position.

 

Common injury symptoms associated with this muscle can be back and outside knee pain, and the feeling of being unstable upon loading the joint. With the areas of pain that are associated, doctors frequently view the area as having a ligament tear of either the lateral collateral, anterior cruciate or posterior cruciate ligaments; however MRI or X-Ray scans will show up clear, therefore leaving the patient in pain and discomfort with no answers.

 

This posterior-lateral knee pain is commonly caused by the under activation of the hamstrings whilst walking or running, therefore making the popliteus muscle over exert itself and be strained under the pressure.

 

Treatment that is very effective in decreasing the pain and helping to relieve the unsteadiness that is felt within the knee joint is remedial massage. Remedial Massage treatment helps by identifying the problem and using different massage styles to release and take the strain off the popliteus.

 

If you think this sounds like something that may be affecting you, call (07) 3398 7022 to book in for an appointment to see one of our accredited remedial massage therapists.

Shin Splints

on Thursday, 02 May 2013. Posted in Sporting Injuries, Acupuncture

Shin Splints is the common term for anterior or medial
tibial stress syndrome. It is a common lower leg injury predominantly found in
those who participate in running sports.
The most common aggravating factors include an increase in training
volume, speed work or hill training or a change to a harder training surface.
In the non-running population walking on uneven ground for long periods or foot
control issues may be aggravating factors.[i]