Articles in Category: General Health

Back to Work Ergonomics! New Year New Habits

on Friday, 18 January 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Ergonomics

Back to Work Ergonomics! New Year New Habits

What better time to start new habits than the first month of 2019! We all know the importance of a ''good working posture'' and long hours of sitting is unhealthy, but trying to maintain yourself in a certain position you are not used to is actually not as easy as you think.

Have you ever tried sitting up as tall and straight as you can but end up feeling more sore and tired on your back? If your answer is YES, then you should definitely read this article.
 
Sitting posture
Let's start off with posture. Speaking to most of my patients, I realise a lot of people try to sit up straight by pulling their shoulders back as much as possible and overarch their lower back. You are actually using the wrong muscles if you do that and that is why it feels uncomfortable overtime. Sitting up properly is all about feeling comfortable and natural when done correctly.
 
Instead of overcorrecting your posture, try imagining a balloon tied to the top of your head and it is slowly pulling you up towards the ceiling while sitting/standing. That is the amount required to maintain a good posture. If you start slouching again overtime, it's okay! It's all about practice.
 
A good tip to remind yourself to not slouch is to buy coloured round stickers (your favourite colour) and stick it around your workstation and home as a reminder.
 
Double Screen Monitors
This is probably what most workstations have these days rather than the old school single screen. Subconsciously you may not realise it but, you are probably only turning your neck and not your body when switching between monitors. Over time the neck gets tired and unhappy with you.
 
Assuming most people have rotating work chairs, try rotating your body towards the screens and your neck will follow along with it. Initially you may need to do this consciously but it will pay off overtime.   
 
And last but not least..
 
The Work Chair
The thing I always say to my patients is “Hips HIGHER than knees”. When sitting on any type, brand and colour of chair, always make sure your hips are sitting higher than your knees! Most high tech ergonomic work chair these days allow you to tilt the seat forward or backwards. Play around with some of the handles at the side and it should let you tilt the back seat of your chair higher. Never let the front part of your chair seat sit higher than the back part.
 
If say you do not own a fantastic ergonomic work chair, simply fold up a towel or a small cushion and sit your buttocks right on top of it. That should give your hips a bit more height or at least at an equal height to your knees.
 
My point is, the right work habits and a good workstation set up should not be difficult and should not bring pain to your body when done correctly.
 
Remember! It is not a NO PAIN NO GAIN FORMULA!
HAPPY NEW YEAR AND HAPPY WORKING! =)

Written By Iris Tan
B.App Sc (Chiropractic)
M.Clin Chiropractic

Exercise Myth Busters - ‘No Pain, No Gain’

on Friday, 18 January 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Training and Performance

Exercise Myth Busters - ‘No Pain, No Gain’

Exercise Myth Busters - ‘No Pain, No Gain’

The ‘no pain no gain’ motto often gets thrown around in the fitness industry, but is there any truth to this type of thinking?

First of all let’s break down the difference between muscle fatigue and soreness versus pain;

Generally the muscle fatigue we experience during a workout is normal. The burn we feel when we exercise is due to acidic protons, called hydrogen ions, being released as we breakdown glucose for energy.

The days following a challenging work out you may experience Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness (DOMS) where you find your muscles are stiff, sore and tired. These symptoms should pass after a few days. If they continue for a longer period of time you may have worked a little too hard, lifted too much or gone for too long. If you find yourself experiencing this it is a good idea to take step back to avoid putting too much strain on the body.

Pain you experience when exercising might be joint pain (e.g. knee or back pain), stabbing or shooting pain in a muscle, or cramping. This type of pain we don’t want during a workout.

When we ‘push through the pain’ bad things can happen. Pain is our body telling us there’s something wrong, you may lack the strength or stability to perform a particular exercise properly. This leads to improper loading of your joints which can cause injury. If we overload our system by ignoring this pain we can see serious injuries like muscle strains, tears, and impingement, spinal disc injuries, ligament injuries, the list goes on.

So the next time someone tells you ‘no pain, no gain’ you can set the record straight that muscle fatigue and soreness if fine but pain is something that should not be in our work outs.

 

 

By Emily Holzberger

 

B.ExSS Majoring in Clinical ExPhys. Memb: ESSA

 

 

Popliteus Injury

on Wednesday, 05 September 2018. Posted in Massage, General Health, Sporting Injuries, Chiropractic

Popliteus Injury

By Luke Attkins

Diploma of Remedial Massage, Certificate IV of Massage Therapy

Member: AAMT, SCA, CAA, CA.

 

Have you ever tried to go for a run or walk and had the feeling that your knee was going to ‘lock up’ or ‘give out’ on you? This is a common cause of popliteus muscle injuries. The popliteus muscles is a small but strong muscle, that’s main action is to internally rotate the tibia (shin bone). Another action this muscle is involved with is the unlocking of the knee joint whilst bending the leg from a fully straightened position.

 

Common injury symptoms associated with this muscle can be back and outside knee pain, and the feeling of being unstable upon loading the joint. With the areas of pain that are associated, doctors frequently view the area as having a ligament tear of either the lateral collateral, anterior cruciate or posterior cruciate ligaments; however MRI or X-Ray scans will show up clear, therefore leaving the patient in pain and discomfort with no answers.

 

This posterior-lateral knee pain is commonly caused by the under activation of the hamstrings whilst walking or running, therefore making the popliteus muscle over exert itself and be strained under the pressure.

 

Treatment that is very effective in decreasing the pain and helping to relieve the unsteadiness that is felt within the knee joint is remedial massage. Remedial Massage treatment helps by identifying the problem and using different massage styles to release and take the strain off the popliteus.

 

If you think this sounds like something that may be affecting you, call (07) 3398 7022 to book in for an appointment to see one of our accredited remedial massage therapists.