Articles in Category: General Health

Exercise Myth Busters - ‘No Pain, No Gain’

on Friday, 18 January 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Training and Performance

Exercise Myth Busters - ‘No Pain, No Gain’

Exercise Myth Busters - ‘No Pain, No Gain’

The ‘no pain no gain’ motto often gets thrown around in the fitness industry, but is there any truth to this type of thinking?

First of all let’s break down the difference between muscle fatigue and soreness versus pain;

Generally the muscle fatigue we experience during a workout is normal. The burn we feel when we exercise is due to acidic protons, called hydrogen ions, being released as we breakdown glucose for energy.

The days following a challenging work out you may experience Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness (DOMS) where you find your muscles are stiff, sore and tired. These symptoms should pass after a few days. If they continue for a longer period of time you may have worked a little too hard, lifted too much or gone for too long. If you find yourself experiencing this it is a good idea to take step back to avoid putting too much strain on the body.

Pain you experience when exercising might be joint pain (e.g. knee or back pain), stabbing or shooting pain in a muscle, or cramping. This type of pain we don’t want during a workout.

When we ‘push through the pain’ bad things can happen. Pain is our body telling us there’s something wrong, you may lack the strength or stability to perform a particular exercise properly. This leads to improper loading of your joints which can cause injury. If we overload our system by ignoring this pain we can see serious injuries like muscle strains, tears, and impingement, spinal disc injuries, ligament injuries, the list goes on.

So the next time someone tells you ‘no pain, no gain’ you can set the record straight that muscle fatigue and soreness if fine but pain is something that should not be in our work outs.

 

 

By Emily Holzberger

 

B.ExSS Majoring in Clinical ExPhys. Memb: ESSA

 

 

Exercise Myth Busters: I don't need to lose weight so I don't need to exercise!

on Wednesday, 06 March 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Nutrition and Recipes, Training and Performance

Fitness vs Fatness

Exercise Myth Busters: I don't need to lose weight so I don't need to exercise!

I’m sure everyone has got that one friend or family member who doesn’t feel they have to exercise because they are ‘slim’ or ‘don’t have to lose weight’.

A meta-analysis completed in 2014 called ‘Fitness and Fatness’ investigated the impact of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and weight on all-cause mortality (risk of death). It was determined that fit individuals at any weight had a significantly lower risk of mortality (death) regardless of their body mass index (BMI). This means that a person who is considered obese but has good CRF has a lower risk of dying than a person who is considered a normal weight but has poor CRF (see graph).

This study changed the way health professionals approached exercise interventions; the focus shifted from weight loss to CRF.

So when you hear someone say ‘I don’t need to lose weight so I don’t need to exercise’ you can tell them that regardless of their weight they should be aiming for high levels of fitness to live a long, healthy life.

There are also so many benefits to performing exercise, just to name a few:

- Significantly reduces disease risk: cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, dementia, osteoporosis, the list goes on.

- Improved quality of life

- Improved mental health and self-esteem

 

 

Written by Emily Holzberger

Qualifications: B. ExSS Majoring in Clinical ExPhys.   

Fascial Dysfunction and Treatment

on Monday, 03 July 2017. Posted in Massage, Newsletters, General Health

Fascial Dysfunction and Treatment

By Luke Attkins

Diploma of Remedial Massage, Certificate IV of Massage Therapy

Member: AAMT, SCA, CAA, CA.

 

Fascia is commonly described as a 3D spider’s web that runs underneath a person’s skin and attaches, stabilizes, encloses, and separates muscles and internal organs.

http://www.fascialfreedom.com.au/resources/fascial%20tissue%203.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A common problem that arises between fascial tissues is adhesions that are caused by the shortening and tightness of the muscular units that surround that area. Fascia that surrounds muscle compartments or is in broad superficial sheets has a tendency to shorten in areas of stress, causing problems in mobility and joint function.

 

Professor Vladimir Janda, characterised myofascial dysfunction into two categories; upper cross and lower cross syndrome. These two syndromes are classified as postural syndromes causing shortening and weakening of specific muscles, leading to postural dysfunction. 

 

Upper-cross syndrome is described as rounding of the shoulders and forward carrying of the head. This postural syndrome shows the tightening and shortening of the pectoralis muscles and upper trapezius whilst simultaneously weakening the rhomboids (middle trapezius).

 

In lower-cross syndrome postural signs are anterior pelvic tilt and accentuated lordosis of the lumbar spine. This is caused by the tightening and shortening of these muscles: hip flexors, tensor fasciae latae (thigh) and erector spinae group whilst simultaneously weakening the abdominal and gluteal muscles.

 

Things that are associated with these two postural syndromes can lead to chronic pain through the back, legs, neck, shoulders, and chest and if left untreated it can start to affect the diaphragm causing problems with breathing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/d1/b3/fd/d1b3fda382e8332abb4f018e0df61ef7.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Myofascial release (MFR) is a physical therapy technique that involves applying gentle pressure into the connective fascial tissue releasing muscular shortness and tightness which in turn helps eliminate pain and help with restoring motion.

 

Techniques that are used in the release of fascial tissue are: skin rolling, fascial stretching, and fascial separation (lifting and rolling of the muscles). The benefits of this treatment are diverse.  Direct bodily effects can help improve flexibility, function, ongoing back, neck, shoulder, hip or any type of pain that is affecting an area containing soft tissue.  MFR is commonly used as an approach to work with tissue-based restrictions and their two-way interactions with movement and posture.  

 

This style of treatment usually goes for 30-60 minutes a session. Recommended amounts of treatment sessions are 4-6 but that may vary across the board as each person responds differently to treatment. 

 

If this sounds like something you may be suffering from or are finding hard to correct, give us a call and book in with Luke Attkins as he is trained in MFR treatment.