Articles in Category: General Health

Exercise Myth Busters

on Friday, 29 March 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Training and Performance

How Can I Exercise when I Don’t Have the Time?

Lack of time or perceived lack of time is an excuse that will often stop people from maintaining or even starting an exercise regime. It seems like a lot of people have this idea that they need to be exercising for at least an hour to make it ‘count’ but this is not the case.

Australian Physical Activity guidelines recommend we perform 30mins of exercise on most, if not all days of the week. It is important to note that this 30mins doesn’t have to be completed in one go. Research suggests that you can receive the same benefit from performing three 10minute blocks of exercise a day. So maybe you could start your day with some body weight resistance exercises before work, go for a short walk at lunch time to get out of the office and then do some stretches at the end of the day to unwind. There we go, we’ve hit the 30mins!

It can also be a good idea to have a look at your week and see if there is time here or there for you to exercise. It’s often the case that you do find some spots that are available. Or maybe you might need to make some small sacrifices; for example instead of spending two hours in front of the TV of an evening, you go for a half hour walk and then reward yourself with some TV afterwards.

You may find some days that you really do struggle to fit in your exercise, that’s when incidental physical activity can be really useful. This is where we perform physical activity doing daily tasks. Maybe you could take the stairs instead of the escalator, park a little further away from work and walk the remaining distance, or do some housework. By being more physically active throughout the day we burn more energy and keep our body’s happy (by not sitting all day)!

At the end of the day ANY exercise is better than no exercise. It has been found that you can significantly reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease by performing as little as an hour of gardening or walking a week. We don’t need to be spending hours a day at the gym to see health benefits.

Planning is what can really help you break down the ‘I don’t have enough time to exercise’ excuse. So at the start of each week have a look at your diary and see what opportunities you have to exercise or at least be physically active!

           

Written by Emily Holzberger

Qualifications: B. ExSS Majoring in Clinical ExPhys.   

 

Resources: Australian Physical Activity Guidelines (2014), Nurses’ Health Study (2016)

Exercise Myth Busters - ‘No Pain, No Gain’

on Friday, 18 January 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Training and Performance

Exercise Myth Busters - ‘No Pain, No Gain’

Exercise Myth Busters - ‘No Pain, No Gain’

The ‘no pain no gain’ motto often gets thrown around in the fitness industry, but is there any truth to this type of thinking?

First of all let’s break down the difference between muscle fatigue and soreness versus pain;

Generally the muscle fatigue we experience during a workout is normal. The burn we feel when we exercise is due to acidic protons, called hydrogen ions, being released as we breakdown glucose for energy.

The days following a challenging work out you may experience Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness (DOMS) where you find your muscles are stiff, sore and tired. These symptoms should pass after a few days. If they continue for a longer period of time you may have worked a little too hard, lifted too much or gone for too long. If you find yourself experiencing this it is a good idea to take step back to avoid putting too much strain on the body.

Pain you experience when exercising might be joint pain (e.g. knee or back pain), stabbing or shooting pain in a muscle, or cramping. This type of pain we don’t want during a workout.

When we ‘push through the pain’ bad things can happen. Pain is our body telling us there’s something wrong, you may lack the strength or stability to perform a particular exercise properly. This leads to improper loading of your joints which can cause injury. If we overload our system by ignoring this pain we can see serious injuries like muscle strains, tears, and impingement, spinal disc injuries, ligament injuries, the list goes on.

So the next time someone tells you ‘no pain, no gain’ you can set the record straight that muscle fatigue and soreness if fine but pain is something that should not be in our work outs.

 

 

By Emily Holzberger

 

B.ExSS Majoring in Clinical ExPhys. Memb: ESSA

 

 

Exercise Myth Busters: I don't need to lose weight so I don't need to exercise!

on Wednesday, 06 March 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Nutrition and Recipes, Training and Performance

Fitness vs Fatness

Exercise Myth Busters: I don't need to lose weight so I don't need to exercise!

I’m sure everyone has got that one friend or family member who doesn’t feel they have to exercise because they are ‘slim’ or ‘don’t have to lose weight’.

A meta-analysis completed in 2014 called ‘Fitness and Fatness’ investigated the impact of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and weight on all-cause mortality (risk of death). It was determined that fit individuals at any weight had a significantly lower risk of mortality (death) regardless of their body mass index (BMI). This means that a person who is considered obese but has good CRF has a lower risk of dying than a person who is considered a normal weight but has poor CRF (see graph).

This study changed the way health professionals approached exercise interventions; the focus shifted from weight loss to CRF.

So when you hear someone say ‘I don’t need to lose weight so I don’t need to exercise’ you can tell them that regardless of their weight they should be aiming for high levels of fitness to live a long, healthy life.

There are also so many benefits to performing exercise, just to name a few:

- Significantly reduces disease risk: cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, dementia, osteoporosis, the list goes on.

- Improved quality of life

- Improved mental health and self-esteem

 

 

Written by Emily Holzberger

Qualifications: B. ExSS Majoring in Clinical ExPhys.