Articles in Category: General Health

Exercise Myth Busters - ‘No Pain, No Gain’

on Friday, 18 January 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Training and Performance

Exercise Myth Busters - ‘No Pain, No Gain’

Exercise Myth Busters - ‘No Pain, No Gain’

The ‘no pain no gain’ motto often gets thrown around in the fitness industry, but is there any truth to this type of thinking?

First of all let’s break down the difference between muscle fatigue and soreness versus pain;

Generally the muscle fatigue we experience during a workout is normal. The burn we feel when we exercise is due to acidic protons, called hydrogen ions, being released as we breakdown glucose for energy.

The days following a challenging work out you may experience Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness (DOMS) where you find your muscles are stiff, sore and tired. These symptoms should pass after a few days. If they continue for a longer period of time you may have worked a little too hard, lifted too much or gone for too long. If you find yourself experiencing this it is a good idea to take step back to avoid putting too much strain on the body.

Pain you experience when exercising might be joint pain (e.g. knee or back pain), stabbing or shooting pain in a muscle, or cramping. This type of pain we don’t want during a workout.

When we ‘push through the pain’ bad things can happen. Pain is our body telling us there’s something wrong, you may lack the strength or stability to perform a particular exercise properly. This leads to improper loading of your joints which can cause injury. If we overload our system by ignoring this pain we can see serious injuries like muscle strains, tears, and impingement, spinal disc injuries, ligament injuries, the list goes on.

So the next time someone tells you ‘no pain, no gain’ you can set the record straight that muscle fatigue and soreness if fine but pain is something that should not be in our work outs.

 

 

By Emily Holzberger

 

B.ExSS Majoring in Clinical ExPhys. Memb: ESSA

 

 

Fascial Dysfunction and Treatment

on Monday, 03 July 2017. Posted in Massage, Newsletters, General Health

Fascial Dysfunction and Treatment

By Luke Attkins

Diploma of Remedial Massage, Certificate IV of Massage Therapy

Member: AAMT, SCA, CAA, CA.

 

Fascia is commonly described as a 3D spider’s web that runs underneath a person’s skin and attaches, stabilizes, encloses, and separates muscles and internal organs.

http://www.fascialfreedom.com.au/resources/fascial%20tissue%203.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A common problem that arises between fascial tissues is adhesions that are caused by the shortening and tightness of the muscular units that surround that area. Fascia that surrounds muscle compartments or is in broad superficial sheets has a tendency to shorten in areas of stress, causing problems in mobility and joint function.

 

Professor Vladimir Janda, characterised myofascial dysfunction into two categories; upper cross and lower cross syndrome. These two syndromes are classified as postural syndromes causing shortening and weakening of specific muscles, leading to postural dysfunction. 

 

Upper-cross syndrome is described as rounding of the shoulders and forward carrying of the head. This postural syndrome shows the tightening and shortening of the pectoralis muscles and upper trapezius whilst simultaneously weakening the rhomboids (middle trapezius).

 

In lower-cross syndrome postural signs are anterior pelvic tilt and accentuated lordosis of the lumbar spine. This is caused by the tightening and shortening of these muscles: hip flexors, tensor fasciae latae (thigh) and erector spinae group whilst simultaneously weakening the abdominal and gluteal muscles.

 

Things that are associated with these two postural syndromes can lead to chronic pain through the back, legs, neck, shoulders, and chest and if left untreated it can start to affect the diaphragm causing problems with breathing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Myofascial release (MFR) is a physical therapy technique that involves applying gentle pressure into the connective fascial tissue releasing muscular shortness and tightness which in turn helps eliminate pain and help with restoring motion.

 

Techniques that are used in the release of fascial tissue are: skin rolling, fascial stretching, and fascial separation (lifting and rolling of the muscles). The benefits of this treatment are diverse.  Direct bodily effects can help improve flexibility, function, ongoing back, neck, shoulder, hip or any type of pain that is affecting an area containing soft tissue.  MFR is commonly used as an approach to work with tissue-based restrictions and their two-way interactions with movement and posture.  

 

This style of treatment usually goes for 30-60 minutes a session. Recommended amounts of treatment sessions are 4-6 but that may vary across the board as each person responds differently to treatment. 

 

If this sounds like something you may be suffering from or are finding hard to correct, give us a call and book in with Luke Attkins as he is trained in MFR treatment.

Herniated Disc

on Thursday, 03 March 2016. Posted in General Health, Chiropractic

Herniated Disc

By Jakob van Vlijmen

M Chiro, DC

 

A Disc herniation is a protrusion of an intervertebral disc. These shock absorbing discs are situated between 2 vertebra and they allow for more elasticity and mobility of the vertebral column. The anatomy of an intervertebral disc is comparable to that of an onion; multiple layers on the outside and a gel in the centre of the disc. Through repetitive incorrect loading of the disc (i.e. prolonged bad posture or faulty lifting mechanics) the inner gel can press on and partly rupture the outer layers.

 

The back or spine consists of 24 vertebras, the sacrum, the coccyx (tailbone) and two hip bones. To be able to move smoothly our spine has little shock absorbing discs in between the vertebra, we have a total of 23 intervertebral discs.

A hernia in the lower back often causes back pain and always causes pain down one or both legs. A dull ache, pins and needles or a catching pain are common symptoms, when the symptoms worsen there is a possibility of loss of strength or numbness down the leg. Because the intervertebral discs aren't connected to many sensory nerves it is possible that the location of the herniation itself isn't painful meaning that even though the problem might be in the back, the only location where pain is felt is in the legs.

 

There are two possible causes for this. One is that the herniated or bulging disc is pressing against a nerve that travels into the leg, causing it to become irritated and producing a signal to the brain which the brain translates as pain in the leg. Another reason for the nerve to produce a signal is not physical compression but a build-up of chemicals in the area due to overuse and irritation of the IVD. These chemicals inflame the nerve and surrounding tissues resulting in the feeling of pain similar to that of a mechanical compression of the nerve.

 

Symptoms of a disc herniation can be very different from case to case depending on which nerve is being compressed and how severely. Lumber (lower back) disc herniation cause symptoms down the legs such as pins and needles and numbness. A disc herniation located in the neck is called a cervical disc herniation and can cause pain in the neck, pain towards the shoulder blade or into the arm.

 

Usually the disc bulges on the side, however it is possible that the bulge is pressing straight back which can, depending on the location, cause a ''Cauda Equina Syndrome''. This is a medical emergency as compression of the spinal cord in this manner can cause the loss of many bodily functions. Such as muscle control over the legs, bowel and bladder control and sexual function. The chiropractor is excellently equipped to recognise and act on such an emergency.

 

A disc herniation is a common injury to the back, which in only 50% of cases causes any pain at all. As people age the IVD lose their elasticity weakening the IVDs. The average age to have a disc herniation is between 20 and 45 years of age. Men are slightly more likely to have a disc herniation than women. 

 

The ruptures in the IVD happen over time caused by bad posture or incorrect movement patterns. Having a static posture (which is the case with many jobs nowadays) increases your chances to develop a disc herniation as does lifting, repetitive bending and twisting the spine. In rare events a disc herniation can be caused suddenly due to severe trauma. 

 

The chiropractor will be asking you questions about your back pain and general health to determine which factors contribute to your pain. Subsequently the Chiropractor will perform an extensive physical examination in which orthopaedic and neurological tests are used to determine which nerve is compressed. The results of these tests are combined with the information gathered during the interview to create a complete and comprehensive picture. There may be times when the chiropractor might deem it necessary to request further imaging most likely an MRI. This is the image modality of choice to asses a disc herniation, as it does not show up at all on an X-ray.

 

A Disc herniation can be a frightening diagnosis, it is important to know however, that research has shown that in 95% of the cases a disc herniation resolves spontaneously within 12 months. However, as this is quite a long period of time the chiropractor endeavours to shorten it by improving spinal function and helping patients return to optimal health as soon as possible. The Chiropractor uses many different techniques which are all focussed at optimising spinal function and taking some of the pressure off the compressed nerve. Not every disc herniation responds well to chiropractic care and for some of them surgery might be a necessity. If this is the case, your chiropractor will help you asses your additional options.