Articles in Category: General Health

Hyperlordosis - Are you Over Arching?

on Friday, 26 May 2017. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Ergonomics, Chiropractic

Hyperlordosis - Are you Over Arching?

Hyperlordosis - Are you Over Arching?

Hyper Lordosis – Are you Over Arching? 

 

Tight Psoas 

Anterior pelvic tilt is the postural position where your butt sticks out more, accentuating the arch on your lower back. So say if you are overarching the lower back doing a back squat or a plank, the odds are high you are over tilting your pelvis forward.

 

Overtime, this issue can contribute to a disc bulge/slipped disc due to the overloading and pressure on the back part of the disc during overextension of the spine and let's not forget the probability of a hip impingement as well from the jamming of the pelvic and femur together in hip flexion and internal rotation.

Facet Joints in Motion

We tend to see this problem a lot more often now as we do spend long hours sitting at a desk or in the car which over activates the hip flexors and lengthens the hip extensors; causing a forward pull of the pelvis.

 

Some of the signs and symptoms of anterior pelvic tilt are:

1.back pain/stiffness especially standing for long periods and/or lying flat on back

2.tight hamstrings

3.gut (protruding belly)

4.gluteal muscles (butt muscles)

5.curve in the lower spine

 

In order to correct this dysfunction, we have to solve the muscle imbalances around the pelvic area. APT is more a stability issue than a mobility one. That being said though, the mobility side of things still need to be addressed.

 

 

Important tight muscles to be stretched to tackle the mobility issues are:

Hip Flexors - https://youtu.be/ut4mGaPvbZk

Hip Flexor 1 Hip Flexor 2

 

Erector Spinae - https://youtu.be/P_4yDo-hiHw  

Erector Spinae 

 

Rectus Femoris (The Quad muscles) - https://youtu.be/ei9Gh6RogDg

Rectus Femoris 

Do these stretches 10-15 times, hold 10-15 seconds post workout and throughout the day. 

 

As mentioned above, the root of APT is from the lack of muscle stability to hold your spine in a neutral position. Without these muscle controls, the body then tries to lock the joints together for stability instead (therefore the overextension of the lower back in squats when further loaded with a barbell/weights).  

 

When addressing stability, start off by reactivating these few muscles: 

Transverse Abdominis (Core stability) – https://youtu.be/T6CaTUBTtUA

Transverse Abdominis 1 Transverse Abdominis 2

Glutes - https://youtu.be/depTc0ME7wk

Glutes 1 Glutes 2

 

Pelvic mobility - https://youtu.be/CU7w8zjrzIc

Pelvic Mobility 1 Pelvic Mobility 2

 

Start with 10-15 reps throughout the day increasing to 30 reps as you progress and have better control.

 

I highly recommend these reactivation exercises to be done in the mornings to ease off any tension built during sleep the night before and before bedtime to de-load the body after a long stressful day at work.

 

You may not feel much progress on the first day, but persist for a week or more; a difference in pain intensity and stiffness will definitely be noticeable!

 

By Iris Tan

B.App.Sc (Chiropractic) M.Clin.Chiropractic. 

Memb: CA, Gonstead (Australia)

Iris picture new contrast 

 

 

 

Incidence Of Low Back Pain

Written by Don Williams BSc, MChiro, ICSSD. on Wednesday, 13 February 2013. Posted in General Health, Chiropractic

Incidence Of Low Back Pain

  • 79.2% of Australians Suffer Low Back Pain at some point in their life. (J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2004 May;27(4):238-44.)
  • 67.6% suffer mild low back pain in any 12 month period
  • In any 6 month period around 10% suffer significant disability from low back pain
  • Most frequently seen musculoskeletal condition in general practice.

Management of Osteoarthritis with Traditional Acupuncture

Written by Richard McMahon, BSc (Acupunture), Dip Remedial Massage on Wednesday, 11 November 2015. Posted in General Health, Acupuncture, Chinese Medicine

Management of Osteoarthritis with Traditional Acupuncture

By Richard McMahon

BHSc (Acupuncutre), Dip Remedial Massage

Overview of Osteo-Arthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive degenerative joint disease that is characterised by the gradual loss of cartilage and subsequent loss of joint movement and pain. It is a leading cause of disability among adults and is associated with major impacts on physical function and mobility. Diagnosis is based on radiological changes and the clinical presentation of joint pain; including tenderness, limitation of movement, crepitus (crunching sounds), and variable degrees of localized inflammation. The prevalence, disability, and associated costs of treating osteoarthritis are expected to steadily increase due to our aging population. It is estimated that approximately 10% of men and 18% of women aged 60 years or older have symptomatic osteoarthritis worldwide. As there is currently no known cure for Osteo-arthritis treatment focuses on management of symptoms. It is common practice to prescribe non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication, paracetamol or in severe cases opioid drugs for pain management. These strategies come with potential side effects so alternate strategies may be desired by patients suffering from the condition.

Research

Included is a summary of a meta-analysis of the studies that have been undertaken on the use of acupuncture in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Additionally an individual study performed in the UK notes the response and cost effectiveness of acupuncture. Also of interest is the inclusion of electro acupuncture for patients who are poor responders to traditional acupuncture and suggestions for treatment frequency and duration.

The systemic review and meta-analysis is titled “Pain management with acupuncture in Osteo- arthritis” by Manyanga et al. The stated objective of the review was to identify and synthesize date from previous randomized controlled trials comparing acupuncture to sham acupuncture, usual care, or no treatment, in adults diagnosed with osteoarthritis. Usual care refers to conservative therapy, pharmacological treatments, and rehabilitive exercises. In most trials, acupuncturists employed traditional hand stimulation of the acupuncture points. The most commonly used acupuncture points were ST34, ST36, Xiyan, GB34 and SP9. These are considered local points and belong to the traditional channel network of Chinese Medicine. Please see our previous articles on Sports Medicine Acupuncture to understand the importance of local, adjacent and distal acupuncture in traditional protocols.

The analysis includes 12 trials and a total of 1763 participants. Duration of interventions ranged from two to twelve weeks, with total follow-up durations ranging from four to 52 weeks. Through the review the researchers found acupuncture administered to adults with osteoarthritis to be associated with a statistically significant reduction in pain intensity, improved functional mobility and improved health-related quality of life. Reductions in pain were greater in trials with longer intervention periods. Major adverse events with acupuncture were not reported. The researchers suggest that acupuncture is most effective for reducing osteoarthritic pain when administered for more than four weeks. The researchers also postulate that due to the chronic inflammatory nature of OA it may be necessary for a “threshold dose” to obtain benefits and as such recommend 10 treatments on average with the aim of reversing the pathological changes that may have occurred in the central nervous system in regards to pain modulation.[i]

 

The second study noted above reports on a nurse led acupuncture study with the aim of postponing or avoiding knee surgery for patients with OA of the knee. 90 patients agreed to participate and after 1 month the trial achieved clinically significant improvements in pain, stiffness and function which continued for up to 2 years for over a third of patients. Acupuncture was given at weekly intervals for 1 month, and then reduced progressively to 6 weekly which mirrors common clinical practice. Patients who did not respond to manual acupuncture are given electro acupuncture and treatment was discontinued at 6 weeks if there is still no response. The researchers concluded that the use of acupuncture was associated with significant reductions in pain intensity and an improvement in functional mobility and quality of life. [ii]

Treatment recommendations

As noted in the above studies acupuncture treatment of OA is best performed weekly for 4-6 weeks and then gradually spread out to a maintenance dose as pain and stiffness decreases. Maintenance schedule depends on a patient’s response to treatment which will be determined by the underlying level of degeneration, their tendencies towards inflammation and the amount of activity required in their day to day lives.



 

[i] Pain management with acupuncture in osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Manyanga et al. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2014; 14: 312.

[ii] Group acupuncture for knee pain: evaluation of a cost-saving initiative in the health service, White et al, Acupunct Med. 2012 Sep; 30(3): 170–175.