Articles in Category: General Health

Is My Scoliosis a Reason for Concern?

on Wednesday, 06 March 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Ergonomics, Chiropractic

Scoliosis

I’m sure most of us know or have heard of 'SCOLIOSIS’ but for those of you where this word is foreign, scoliosis is a term used when your spine is not straight or is curved to the side.

Now that we know what scoliosis means, did you know that there are different types/causes of scoliosis? Rather than bombarding your brains with too much information, we will discuss the two most common types of scoliosis; Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis and Degenerative Scoliosis.

1. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis is by far the most common form of scoliosis affecting children between the ages of 10 to 18 years old. Unfortunately, we still have no idea what the single cause is however we know sometimes this form of scoliosis can be correlated with lower back pain.

Not all children with scoliosis will have pain/symptoms so these are some of the signs to look out for:

1.One shoulder is higher than the other

2.One hip is higher than the other

3.Their head will not look centred with the body

4.When bending forward, a hump is obvious

Scoliosis

2. Degenerative Scoliosis

Degenerative Scoliosis or also known as Adult Onset Scoliosis; is a type of spinal deformity that progresses overtime when we are adults. Therefore, people who don’t have a history of adolescent scoliosis can develop it from spinal degeneration (wear and tear of the spinal bones), Osteoporosis (loss of bone density) or Osteomalacia (softening of bones).

Unlike Adolescent Scoliosis, there is usually no obvious physical deformity. You are likely to experience more back pain (probable to be from the degenerative spine) and numbness/tingling down the arms/legs that initiates patients to have it checked by a health practitioner.

A QUICK ASSESSMENT (ADAM's SIGN)

If you are questioning whether you or your child may have scoliosis, this is a simple test to perform and identify it at home:

1.Start with the person in a standing position.

2.Have the person bend forward from the waist until the back is in a horizontal plane.

3.Keep the feet together, knees extended and arms at the side.

If a rib hump is visible while the person is bending forward, it is an indication of scoliosis.

Scoliosis 2

Physical examination is just the initial testing for scoliosis. Ideally an X-ray is required to have a better idea of the severity/degree of the deformity. Moral of the story is if you aren't sure; have it checked out by a professional!

 

Written By Iris Tan

B.App Sc (Chiropractic) M.Clin Chiropractic

Reference:

The Benefits of Stretching

on Wednesday, 06 March 2019. Posted in Massage, Newsletters, General Health, Sporting Injuries, Training and Performance

Stretching

There are many benefits to regular stretching, not only can stretching help increase your flexibility; it may also improve posture and body aches.

Increases Flexibility:

Regular stretching may help to increase your flexibility. Improved flexibility can help you perform daily activities with ease and may also help delay reduced mobility that can come with aging.

Increases Range of Motion:

The ability to move a joint through its full range of motion gives you more freedom of movement. Regular stretching may help increase your range of motion. A study found that both static and dynamic stretching are effective for increasing range of motion, although proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching may be more effective for immediate benefit.

Improves Performance in Physical Activities:

Dynamic stretching prior to physical activity has been shown to help your muscles prepare for the activity.

Increases Blood Flow to Muscles:

Regular stretching may improve your circulation which increases blood flow to your muscles. This may shorten your recovery time and reduce delayed onset muscle soreness.

The most common types of stretching are dynamic and static.

Dynamic Stretching:

Dynamic stretching involves the movement of joints through their full range of motion in a slow and controlled manner. They are often used as a warm-up prior to physical activity and there are no extended holds. Generally, the type of movement, or dynamic stretch used will be similar to the activity about to be performed. “High knees” or ‘butt kicks” are examples of dynamic stretching that may be performed before running.

Static Stretching:

Static stretching involves moving the body into a stretch and holding for an extended period of time. Timing of the extended stretch varies though they are commonly prescribed for 15-30 seconds at a time for 3-5 times. Static stretching can be performed actively by using your own muscles to hold the positions, or passively, using an external force such as a strap, a wall or another person. Bending down and touching your toes or letting the heels drop down off the edge of a step are examples of static stretching.

Dynamic and static stretching can be effective for increasing flexibility

Pre-activity dynamic stretching may improve performance

Post-activity static stretching may prevent delayed onset muscle soreness

Stretching is generally a safe activity that can be included as part of your daily activity

Written by Maharlia Kennedy

Dip. Remedial Massage

Exercise Myth Busters: I don't need to lose weight so I don't need to exercise!

on Wednesday, 06 March 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Nutrition and Recipes, Training and Performance

Fitness vs Fatness

Exercise Myth Busters: I don't need to lose weight so I don't need to exercise!

I’m sure everyone has got that one friend or family member who doesn’t feel they have to exercise because they are ‘slim’ or ‘don’t have to lose weight’.

A meta-analysis completed in 2014 called ‘Fitness and Fatness’ investigated the impact of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and weight on all-cause mortality (risk of death). It was determined that fit individuals at any weight had a significantly lower risk of mortality (death) regardless of their body mass index (BMI). This means that a person who is considered obese but has good CRF has a lower risk of dying than a person who is considered a normal weight but has poor CRF (see graph).

This study changed the way health professionals approached exercise interventions; the focus shifted from weight loss to CRF.

So when you hear someone say ‘I don’t need to lose weight so I don’t need to exercise’ you can tell them that regardless of their weight they should be aiming for high levels of fitness to live a long, healthy life.

There are also so many benefits to performing exercise, just to name a few:

- Significantly reduces disease risk: cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, dementia, osteoporosis, the list goes on.

- Improved quality of life

- Improved mental health and self-esteem

 

 

Written by Emily Holzberger

Qualifications: B. ExSS Majoring in Clinical ExPhys.