Articles in Category: General Health

4 Exercises to Beat Text Neck

on Tuesday, 11 June 2019. Posted in General Health, Ergonomics, Chiropractic

What exercises help with good posture?

4 Exercises to Beat Text Neck

Over time, we have all suffered from what they call text neck or bad posture. Bad posture can come in many shapes and forms. Sitting at a desk for prolonged periods of time has people slouching and sticking their head forward, bad ergonomics can contribute to poor posture at the work desk and smartphones can cause bad posture. In fact, text neck is one of the leading causes of bad posture as younger generations progress to being attached to their smart devices.

Throughout time, there have been many products and cues that have been used to try and address the issue of bad posture. Products range from gym balls, back supports, postural chairs, postural belts and varidesks. Even postural cues like 'pull your shoulders back' or 'stand up tall' are common phrases used.

As much as these products and cues have their positive points, nothing beats having a good postural exercise regime that doesn't take too long to implement into a daily routine.

The first thing that should be implemented are micro breaks. Micro breaks are a great exercise for office workers that are sitting for the majority of the day. It works by setting an alarm or reminder to get up move around and reset the body.

Below I have listed four exercises that help address bad posture by either targeting weak muscles to help strengthen or by increasing the mobility through that stiff mid back region.

Seated thoracic stretch

Brugger stretch

Chin tucks

Floor angels

Written By Luke Attkins
Bsc Chiropractic, M. Clin. Chiropractic, Dip. Remedial, Dip. FIFA Medical, Cert. DNS Sport

5 THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT SHOULDER PAIN

on Tuesday, 02 April 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Sporting Injuries, Training and Performance

Shoulder Pain

Shoulder injuries are one of the most stubborn injuries I deal with as a practitioner. They happen very gradually and linger for a long time. Not excruciatingly painful but definitely annoyingly dull and achy is how I would describe it.

Here are 5 things you should know about shoulder pain:

1.They are highly treatable if addressed early

People with shoulder pain usually do not seek early medical attention. It is the type of pain where people tend to ignore initially because of its subtleness BUT ignoring the pain will not make it go way. In fact, it will usually continue worsening the longer you wait to seek care. The earlier you see a practitioner, the better it will respond to physical therapy and regain its range of motion.

2.Treat your shoulder blade while treating rotator cuff injuries

The shoulder blade serves as a platform for the muscles of the shoulder (rotator cuffs). When there is an injury to the rotator cuffs, it is directly related to how well the shoulder blade is working too. A weak and unstable shoulder blade will produce an unstable base for the rotator cuffs hence possibly causing the muscles to be compromised therefore leading to injury and weaknesses. So it is important to include shoulder blade stabilising exercises on top of rotator cuff strengthening. 

 Shoulder Projections

Shoulder Projections

YouTube Link: https://youtu.be/hhL6iIxcdRs

 3.Frozen Shoulder is more common in middle aged women

Frozen shoulder happens when the lining of the joint within the shoulder is inflamed. The gradual thickening of this area results in the stiffening of the shoulder and it becoming more painful with movement. No one knows the exact cause of a frozen shoulder but women between the ages of 40-65 years old have a greater prevalence.

 4.Sleeping position is important

While taking some time to recover from a shoulder injury, it is important that you find a sleeping position that is tolerable. If you are a side sleeper, try sleeping on the non-painful shoulder. Taking pressure off the affected joint will reduce irritation to it. If your shoulder pain is near the front, sleeping on your back can help evenly distribute your weight and again keep pressure off.

 5.Shoulder pain can be a referral

Most shoulder pain is highly likely to be musculoskeletal in nature but sometimes other conditions can also cause referral into the shoulder. If your shoulder pain is unexplained and does not change when you move your neck, shoulder or arm there is a high chance the problem is coming from somewhere else (such as gallstone, heart or blood vessel problems and lung problems). It is important to be checked out by your medical practitioner for further examination.

 

 

Written By Iris Tan
B.App Sc (Chiropractic) M.Clin Chiropractic

Exercise Myth Busters

on Friday, 29 March 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Training and Performance

How Can I Exercise when I Don’t Have the Time?

Lack of time or perceived lack of time is an excuse that will often stop people from maintaining or even starting an exercise regime. It seems like a lot of people have this idea that they need to be exercising for at least an hour to make it ‘count’ but this is not the case.

Australian Physical Activity guidelines recommend we perform 30mins of exercise on most, if not all days of the week. It is important to note that this 30mins doesn’t have to be completed in one go. Research suggests that you can receive the same benefit from performing three 10minute blocks of exercise a day. So maybe you could start your day with some body weight resistance exercises before work, go for a short walk at lunch time to get out of the office and then do some stretches at the end of the day to unwind. There we go, we’ve hit the 30mins!

It can also be a good idea to have a look at your week and see if there is time here or there for you to exercise. It’s often the case that you do find some spots that are available. Or maybe you might need to make some small sacrifices; for example instead of spending two hours in front of the TV of an evening, you go for a half hour walk and then reward yourself with some TV afterwards.

You may find some days that you really do struggle to fit in your exercise, that’s when incidental physical activity can be really useful. This is where we perform physical activity doing daily tasks. Maybe you could take the stairs instead of the escalator, park a little further away from work and walk the remaining distance, or do some housework. By being more physically active throughout the day we burn more energy and keep our body’s happy (by not sitting all day)!

At the end of the day ANY exercise is better than no exercise. It has been found that you can significantly reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease by performing as little as an hour of gardening or walking a week. We don’t need to be spending hours a day at the gym to see health benefits.

Planning is what can really help you break down the ‘I don’t have enough time to exercise’ excuse. So at the start of each week have a look at your diary and see what opportunities you have to exercise or at least be physically active!

           

Written by Emily Holzberger

Qualifications: B. ExSS Majoring in Clinical ExPhys.   

 

Resources: Australian Physical Activity Guidelines (2014), Nurses’ Health Study (2016)