Articles in Category: Ergonomics

Hyperlordosis - Are you Over Arching?

on Friday, 26 May 2017. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Ergonomics, Chiropractic

Hyperlordosis - Are you Over Arching?

Hyperlordosis - Are you Over Arching?

Hyper Lordosis – Are you Over Arching? 

 

Tight Psoas 

Anterior pelvic tilt is the postural position where your butt sticks out more, accentuating the arch on your lower back. So say if you are overarching the lower back doing a back squat or a plank, the odds are high you are over tilting your pelvis forward.

 

Overtime, this issue can contribute to a disc bulge/slipped disc due to the overloading and pressure on the back part of the disc during overextension of the spine and let's not forget the probability of a hip impingement as well from the jamming of the pelvic and femur together in hip flexion and internal rotation.

Facet Joints in Motion

We tend to see this problem a lot more often now as we do spend long hours sitting at a desk or in the car which over activates the hip flexors and lengthens the hip extensors; causing a forward pull of the pelvis.

 

Some of the signs and symptoms of anterior pelvic tilt are:

1.back pain/stiffness especially standing for long periods and/or lying flat on back

2.tight hamstrings

3.gut (protruding belly)

4.gluteal muscles (butt muscles)

5.curve in the lower spine

 

In order to correct this dysfunction, we have to solve the muscle imbalances around the pelvic area. APT is more a stability issue than a mobility one. That being said though, the mobility side of things still need to be addressed.

 

 

Important tight muscles to be stretched to tackle the mobility issues are:

Hip Flexors - https://youtu.be/ut4mGaPvbZk

Hip Flexor 1 Hip Flexor 2

 

Erector Spinae - https://youtu.be/P_4yDo-hiHw  

Erector Spinae 

 

Rectus Femoris (The Quad muscles) - https://youtu.be/ei9Gh6RogDg

Rectus Femoris 

Do these stretches 10-15 times, hold 10-15 seconds post workout and throughout the day. 

 

As mentioned above, the root of APT is from the lack of muscle stability to hold your spine in a neutral position. Without these muscle controls, the body then tries to lock the joints together for stability instead (therefore the overextension of the lower back in squats when further loaded with a barbell/weights).  

 

When addressing stability, start off by reactivating these few muscles: 

Transverse Abdominis (Core stability) – https://youtu.be/T6CaTUBTtUA

Transverse Abdominis 1 Transverse Abdominis 2

Glutes - https://youtu.be/depTc0ME7wk

Glutes 1 Glutes 2

 

Pelvic mobility - https://youtu.be/CU7w8zjrzIc

Pelvic Mobility 1 Pelvic Mobility 2

 

Start with 10-15 reps throughout the day increasing to 30 reps as you progress and have better control.

 

I highly recommend these reactivation exercises to be done in the mornings to ease off any tension built during sleep the night before and before bedtime to de-load the body after a long stressful day at work.

 

You may not feel much progress on the first day, but persist for a week or more; a difference in pain intensity and stiffness will definitely be noticeable!

 

By Iris Tan

B.App.Sc (Chiropractic) M.Clin.Chiropractic. 

Memb: CA, Gonstead (Australia)

Iris picture new contrast 

 

 

 

Is My Scoliosis a Reason for Concern?

on Wednesday, 06 March 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Ergonomics, Chiropractic

Scoliosis

I’m sure most of us know or have heard of 'SCOLIOSIS’ but for those of you where this word is foreign, scoliosis is a term used when your spine is not straight or is curved to the side.

Now that we know what scoliosis means, did you know that there are different types/causes of scoliosis? Rather than bombarding your brains with too much information, we will discuss the two most common types of scoliosis; Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis and Degenerative Scoliosis.

1. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis is by far the most common form of scoliosis affecting children between the ages of 10 to 18 years old. Unfortunately, we still have no idea what the single cause is however we know sometimes this form of scoliosis can be correlated with lower back pain.

Not all children with scoliosis will have pain/symptoms so these are some of the signs to look out for:

1.One shoulder is higher than the other

2.One hip is higher than the other

3.Their head will not look centred with the body

4.When bending forward, a hump is obvious

Scoliosis

2. Degenerative Scoliosis

Degenerative Scoliosis or also known as Adult Onset Scoliosis; is a type of spinal deformity that progresses overtime when we are adults. Therefore, people who don’t have a history of adolescent scoliosis can develop it from spinal degeneration (wear and tear of the spinal bones), Osteoporosis (loss of bone density) or Osteomalacia (softening of bones).

Unlike Adolescent Scoliosis, there is usually no obvious physical deformity. You are likely to experience more back pain (probable to be from the degenerative spine) and numbness/tingling down the arms/legs that initiates patients to have it checked by a health practitioner.

A QUICK ASSESSMENT (ADAM's SIGN)

If you are questioning whether you or your child may have scoliosis, this is a simple test to perform and identify it at home:

1.Start with the person in a standing position.

2.Have the person bend forward from the waist until the back is in a horizontal plane.

3.Keep the feet together, knees extended and arms at the side.

If a rib hump is visible while the person is bending forward, it is an indication of scoliosis.

Scoliosis 2

Physical examination is just the initial testing for scoliosis. Ideally an X-ray is required to have a better idea of the severity/degree of the deformity. Moral of the story is if you aren't sure; have it checked out by a professional!

 

Written By Iris Tan

B.App Sc (Chiropractic) M.Clin Chiropractic

Reference:

Low Back Pain (LBP) associated with Leg Pain/Discomfort

on Thursday, 14 February 2019. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Ergonomics, Chiropractic

Low Back Pain (LBP) associated with Leg Pain/Discomfort

Practitioner: “Can you please describe your problem for me?”

Patient: “Yes. I have this Chronic Lower Back Pain that if it triggers, I can feel in my leg(s) as well. I start work from 9am, the pain will start crawling in after an hour of sitting, and then I can feel the pain down into my leg(s) after that. But, if I stand up and walk around a little bit, the pain will ease. This is why I have been putting treatment off for so long.”

 

Does this sound familiar?

The question is why does the LBP sometimes follow with leg pain? If the LBP is already a pain in the backside, why does the leg pain love to join the party?

If we look into the User’s Manual for the human body – lower body in particular, the question can easily be answered.

 

The difference between disc origin and muscular origin is if the pain travels below the knee. This is the reason why most practitioners are critical to the pain below or above the knee. If the pain travels below the knee, it is suggested to be disc lesion. If the pain does not travel below the knee, it is suggested to be muscular-related. Unfortunately, there is a User’s Manual 1.1 that specifies that each person is unique, and there could be an occasional case where the above situation differs.

 

Studies have shown that younger patients experience more discomfort in a sitting position due to increased disc pressure, but gain relief by standing up and walking (Souza, 2014). Whereas older patients have trouble when walking or standing due to gravity pull with a compressive effect that applies pressure onto the posterior (back) aspect of the region (Souza, 2014).

 

The patient sometimes describes the pain only in one leg or both legs at the same time. The difference between the two is disc-related pain for one leg and stenosis-related (narrowing) leg pain for both legs.

 

Pain below the knee is suggested to be caused by a disc lesion; chiropractic treatment usually has a beneficial effect and is able to achieve a good result.

 

Pain above the knee is suggested to be muscular-related. A trigger point is a term used to describe a tender area of the body that is irritated by a particular muscle group and has created a referral pattern to another area of the body. An example such as, an iliopsoas trigger point can cause referral pattern down to the front of the thigh, a piriformis trigger point can cause referral pattern down to the back of the thigh, or a Tensor Fascia Lata (TFL) can cause referral pattern down to the side of the thigh. These three muscles are located either deep inside our lumbar region or on the side of our hip region, which can mimic LBP. If by adding trigger point patterns into the equation, we have a lower back pain associated with leg pain/discomfort symptom.

 

Therefore, finding a practitioner with the advanced ability to diagnose this is essential to determine which type of treatment is most suitable for the patient. Once the partitioner is found, it would be wise to stick with them. If the partitioner provides effective treatment, plus a strong ethical view, it is considered hitting the jackpot.

 

 

Written by David Hsu

Dip Remedial Massage, Bachelor Rn. Diploma Osteopathy (Canada)

 

Reference:

Souza, T. (2014). Differential Diagnosis and Management for Chiropractors. Burlington: Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC.