Articles in Category: Chiropractic

How To Correct Lower Back Pain

on Wednesday, 13 February 2013. Posted in Ergonomics, Chiropractic

Lower back pain is one of the leading financial burdens on the Australian public health purse. Costing the government and consumer billions of dollars per year.
This problem creates a massive negative impact on  peoples quality of life and their ability to participate in their normal daily routine.
According to one of the leading journals, 79.2% of Australians Suffer Lower Back Pain at some point in their life. (J manipulative Physiol Ther. 2004 May;27(4):238-44.)
We also know that

Hyperlordosis - Are you Over Arching?

on Friday, 26 May 2017. Posted in Newsletters, General Health, Ergonomics, Chiropractic

Hyperlordosis - Are you Over Arching?

Hyperlordosis - Are you Over Arching?

Hyper Lordosis – Are you Over Arching? 

 

Tight Psoas 

Anterior pelvic tilt is the postural position where your butt sticks out more, accentuating the arch on your lower back. So say if you are overarching the lower back doing a back squat or a plank, the odds are high you are over tilting your pelvis forward.

 

Overtime, this issue can contribute to a disc bulge/slipped disc due to the overloading and pressure on the back part of the disc during overextension of the spine and let's not forget the probability of a hip impingement as well from the jamming of the pelvic and femur together in hip flexion and internal rotation.

Facet Joints in Motion

We tend to see this problem a lot more often now as we do spend long hours sitting at a desk or in the car which over activates the hip flexors and lengthens the hip extensors; causing a forward pull of the pelvis.

 

Some of the signs and symptoms of anterior pelvic tilt are:

1.back pain/stiffness especially standing for long periods and/or lying flat on back

2.tight hamstrings

3.gut (protruding belly)

4.gluteal muscles (butt muscles)

5.curve in the lower spine

 

In order to correct this dysfunction, we have to solve the muscle imbalances around the pelvic area. APT is more a stability issue than a mobility one. That being said though, the mobility side of things still need to be addressed.

 

 

Important tight muscles to be stretched to tackle the mobility issues are:

Hip Flexors - https://youtu.be/ut4mGaPvbZk

Hip Flexor 1 Hip Flexor 2

 

Erector Spinae - https://youtu.be/P_4yDo-hiHw  

Erector Spinae 

 

Rectus Femoris (The Quad muscles) - https://youtu.be/ei9Gh6RogDg

Rectus Femoris 

Do these stretches 10-15 times, hold 10-15 seconds post workout and throughout the day. 

 

As mentioned above, the root of APT is from the lack of muscle stability to hold your spine in a neutral position. Without these muscle controls, the body then tries to lock the joints together for stability instead (therefore the overextension of the lower back in squats when further loaded with a barbell/weights).  

 

When addressing stability, start off by reactivating these few muscles: 

Transverse Abdominis (Core stability) – https://youtu.be/T6CaTUBTtUA

Transverse Abdominis 1 Transverse Abdominis 2

Glutes - https://youtu.be/depTc0ME7wk

Glutes 1 Glutes 2

 

Pelvic mobility - https://youtu.be/CU7w8zjrzIc

Pelvic Mobility 1 Pelvic Mobility 2

 

Start with 10-15 reps throughout the day increasing to 30 reps as you progress and have better control.

 

I highly recommend these reactivation exercises to be done in the mornings to ease off any tension built during sleep the night before and before bedtime to de-load the body after a long stressful day at work.

 

You may not feel much progress on the first day, but persist for a week or more; a difference in pain intensity and stiffness will definitely be noticeable!

 

By Iris Tan

B.App.Sc (Chiropractic) M.Clin.Chiropractic. 

Memb: CA, Gonstead (Australia)

Iris picture new contrast 

 

 

 

Incidence Of Low Back Pain

Written by Don Williams BSc, MChiro, ICSSD. on Wednesday, 13 February 2013. Posted in General Health, Chiropractic

Incidence Of Low Back Pain

  • 79.2% of Australians Suffer Low Back Pain at some point in their life. (J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2004 May;27(4):238-44.)
  • 67.6% suffer mild low back pain in any 12 month period
  • In any 6 month period around 10% suffer significant disability from low back pain
  • Most frequently seen musculoskeletal condition in general practice.